by Walter Noons on November 8, 2015

For the purpose of declassifying cannabis from the Controlled Substance Act, it serves the objectives of the re-legalization movement to have remain Schedule I drug, rather than rescheduling it as a Schedule II drug.

Why, you may ask?

Cannabis became a Schedule I drug in the 1970, when Congress passed the Controlled Substance Act, which was signed by President Richard Nixon. The act established the schedules by which drugs would be classified and temporarily listed marijuana as a Schedule I substance, subject to review. The administration then formed a commission to study marijuana and advise the administration on where it should be permanently placed.

The commission acknowledged that marijuana was less a serious threat to public health than a sensitive social issue and recommended changes to federal law that would permit citizens to possess a small amount of it at a time, while still maintaining that the drug should not be legalized.

The commission’s approach to drug policy didn’t resonate with many Americans or politicians at that time, who were far more concerned about the potential societal ills that could strike if marijuana use was left unfettered — an attitude that was partially based in racism and in providing Richard Nixon with a weapon to combat the Anti-War Movement.

So, Cannabis became a Schedule I, which means:

The drug or other substance has a high potential for abuse.

The drug or other substance has no currently accepted medical treatment use in the U.S.

There is a lack of accepted safety for use of the drug or substance under medical supervision.

Since then, Cannabis has been grouped along with other Schedule I drugs such as Heroin, LSD, Mescaline, MDMA, GBH, Ecstacy, Psilocybin, Methaqualone, Khat and Bath Salts.

Leaving aside for the moment the inappropriateness of several of the drugs being listed above as being properly identified in Schedule I, the value in Cannabis being defined as a Schedule I drug underscores the ludicrousness and inappropriateness of said classification in light of forty-five years of evidence to the contrary.

Now comes Hillary Clinton who is recommending that Cannabis should become a Schedule II drug, which according to the CSA means:

The drug or other substance has a high potential for abuse.

The drug or other substance has a currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States or a currently accepted medical use with severe restrictions.

Abuse of the drug or other substances may lead to severe psychological or physical dependence.

Other Schedule II drugs include: combination products with less than 15 milligrams of hydrocodone per dosage unit (Vicodin), cocaine, methamphetamine, methadone, hydromorphone (Dilaudid), meperidine (Demerol), oxycodone (OxyContin), fentanyl, Dexedrine, Adderall, and Ritalin.

The result of such an inappropriate and clinically unsupportable re-classification would codify cannabis as a dangerous drug and would, for all intents and purposes, end the likelihood of Cannabis every becoming a Schedule V drug:

The drug or other substance has a low potential for abuse relative to the drugs or other substances in schedule IV

The drug or other substance has a currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States.

Abuse of the drug or other substance may lead to limited physical dependence or psychological dependence relative to the drugs or other substances in schedule IV.

However it would be far more appropriate that Cannabis be removed completely from being classified within the CSA and should instead be placed within the pharmacopoeia along other useful and beneficial homeopathic plants.