A local attorney claims that prosecutors are pressuring crime labs to change the way THC is reported in an effort to circumvent the state’s medical marijuana law.

Attorney Michael Komorn is alleging that scientists were pressured to report that the THC contained in waxes, oils and edibles had an unknown origin if no signs of visible plant material could be found. In this way, the THC would be considered a synthetic substance – not marijuana. Rather than being charged with a misdemeanor, those caught with the so-called synthetic substance could be assessed a two-year felony.

Komorn states that the crime lab is “systemically biased” towards reporting synthetic THC (a felony) rather than marijuana (a misdemeanor)

Komorn states that the crime lab is “systemically biased” towards reporting synthetic THC (a felony) rather than marijuana (a misdemeanor)

Max Lorincz, a Spring Lake resident with a valid medical marijuana card, may be facing felony charges after a police officer who was responding to a 911 medical call spotted a small amount of hash oil in his home.

Lorincz was charged with marijuana possession, but refused to plead guilty as his MMJ card should make his possession of medical cannabis legal.

Attorney Komorn made use of the freedom of information act to obtain emails from workers at the state police crime lab. Some messages voice concerns about the way THC cases had to be reported. Some testified in court about a new policy that denied evidence of THC coming from marijuana plant if no plant material was found.

Komorn claims that Bill Schuette, state Attorney General and opponent of medical marijuana, and the Prosecuting Attorneys Association of Michigan are influencing state policy.

But authorities state that examiners need to see plant material in order to report that the origin of the THC is from the marijuana plant. Examiners have no way of knowing how the THC was produced unless they watched its production. Authorities also argue that if even a speck of plant material is found in the oil, the tests will come back as marijuana.

Such assumptions could lead to the wrong conviction of a synthetic THC rather than marijuana

Prosecutors ultimately rely on reports from filing charges. A crime lab report with a delta-1-THC that has an unknown origin would lead the prosecutor to believe that the substance was synthetic, and therefore, subject to felony charges. Such assumptions could lead to the wrong conviction of a synthetic THC rather than marijuana.

While there are some officials who are opposed to medical cannabis legalization, the push for legalization of adult use is still ongoing in the state. MILegalize, a pro-marijuana activist group, is raising awareness and rallying support to put such a measure on the November 2016 ballot.

Source: MJWellness

  • Stephen Karnes

    This idiocy was no doubt sponsored by the private prison companies looking for ways to lock up more people