My colleague stumbled upon this book at the American Book Center in Amsterdam and realized he had to pick up this book. Good guess, because when he bought the book for some reason it wasn’t available online at many places yet.

How To Change Your Mind Review

How To Change Your Mind
Doing homework at the beach. © The Stoned Society

As such, he gave it a go and not long after started quoting me parts of it. Intrigued, he recommended the book to me as he did with Chasing The Scream by Johann Hari. He reads many drug-related books, but like Chasing The Scream this recommendation really came from somewhere. I knew Michael Pollan already from his article on Trip Treatment in the New Yorker and later watched him featured on the Joe Rogan Experience podcast.

I was happy to be able to borrow How To Change Your Mind during a hot summer month this year and quickly progressed in the book existing of 480 pages. After a day, I had already read 80 pages so I knew those other 480 were going to be read in a breeze.

Anti-propaganda and Timothy Leary

What the author is also clearly good at is choosing the perspective of the general public

It reads in a somewhat chronological order, with sometimes anecdotes delving deeper in a period of Psychedelic science. As an activist but also as a generally interested person in psychedelics, he manages to clarify the period of legal psychedelic studies starting in the 50’s into the 70’s, after which psychedelic science pretty much came to a halt thanks to anti-psychedelic propaganda. Of course, he couldn’t pass on Timothy Leary but he does so with not too many words. In part, because many researchers believe Leary likely did more bad than good to future psychedelic science.

What the author is also clearly good at is choosing the perspective of the general public, by going ‘you might think this, but…”.

This works particularly well, as you would expect from a multiple New York Times bestseller.

Psychedelic treatment

He too manages to include passages about his own psychedelic treatment and manages to gain huge respect while doing so.

This also got me personally thinking about my own take on psychedelics, which probably falls under recreational use

This also got me personally thinking about my own take on psychedelics, which probably falls under recreational use. But as Bob Jesse would say: ‘Recreational does not mean frivolous, careless or lacking in intention’.

Then again, reading through the last couple of pages and the various psychedelic treatment studies that are happening, it does bring to question why perhaps it is more valuable to undergo psychedelic treatment instead of following Leary’s advice of ‘Turn on, tune in, drop out’.

Even if reading might not be your favorite past time and you would rather eat some mushrooms I recommend reading How To Change Your Mind (first) after which you can do your mushrooms… You might learn something.